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Joris Jansen RAPALJE

Joris Jansen RAPALJE

Male 1604 -

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  • Name Joris Jansen RAPALJE 
    Born 28 Apr 1604  Spanish Netherlands Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    EMIG 1624  aboard ship New Netherland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I326  The Turses
    Last Modified 9 Jul 2017 

    Family Catalina TRICO 
    Married 1624  Amsterdam, Holland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Sarah RAPALJE,   b. 1625, New Amsterdam, New York, Ny Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Judith Jorise RAPALJE,   b. 5 Jul 1635
    Last Modified 25 Sep 2017 
    Family ID F223  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1624 - Amsterdam, Holland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Clipped from http://longislandsurnames.com/getperson.php?personID=I53753&tree=Conklinother. The history of this couple is extensive. Our family line derives from their granddaughter who married Claes Arentsen Toers

      [Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY. He was the son of 14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje and 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.] He married 7383. Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624.
      7383. Catalyntie Trico, born 1605 in Paris, France; died 11 Sep 1689 in Wallabout, LI, NY. She was the daughter of 14766. Joris Trico.

      14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje. He married 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.
      14765. Brecktje Rapelje. She was the daughter of 29530. Gaspard Colet de Rapelje and 29531. Janssen daughter of Abram.

      Children of Victor Rapelje and Brecktje Rapelje are:

      i. Antonie Rapelje.

      7382 ii. Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY; married Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624

      Joris Jansen de Rapalie was a French Huguenot from Rochelle in France who emigrated to America in 1623 in the ship Unity, a ship of the West India Company, and settled at Fort Orange (now Albany, New York), where he lived for 3 years. In 1626 he removed to New Amsterdam located on Manhattan Island, New York, until after the birth of his youngest child. He obtained from the West India Company a house and lot on Pearl Street where he lived for many years. The Pearl Street lot grant was confirmed to him with a deed dated March 13, 1647. On June 22, 1654 he sold his Pearl Street lot with its house that he had built-up to Hendrick Hendrickson.On June 16, 1637 he bought from the Indians a tract of 335 acres of land, he called Rennegaconock (now included within the town of Brooklyn, LI, NY. In 1655 he became a Long Island resident for the rest of his life. He was a leading citizen, acted a prominent part of public affairs of the colony and served in the magistracy of Brooklyn. In 1641 he was elected by the people as one of 12 men to advise the Council regarding Indian policy. He died soon after the close of the Dutch administration. His widow, Catalyentie, daughter of Joris Trico, surviving him many years. She was born in Paris, France and died in Wallabout, New York, on September 11, 1689 at age 84.

      In 1626, Joris and Catalyntje, with their daughter Sarah, moved to New Amsterdam, where they remained for the next 22 years. During at least part of that time, Joris was a tavern-keeper. His name appears in the records of the burgomasters court among those who promised to observe Governor Stuyvesant's proclamations regarding the regulation of taverns (these proclamations were in effect prior to the creation of the courts). In about 1655, Joris and Catalyntje, and presumably the younger children, moved to the farm on the 'Bay of the Walloons' or Waele-Boght. It was located where the present United States Marine Hospital now stands, and also included the area between Nostrand and Grand Avenues, about three hundred thirty acres altogether.

      Jorge (George) Jansen de Rappelje, Teunis Guysbert Bogart, and Jeremiah Remse Vanderbeeck, farmers from Waael in the Netherlands were the first men who began farming in the New Netherlands, at Wallabout, in 1625.

      Joris Janszen Repalje, Huguenot, son of Jean, was baptized April 26, 1604 at Valenciennes. He was one of six children of Jean Rapareillet and his unnamed wife. He was baptized April 28, 1604, as entered in the Register of St. Nicholaes Roman Catholic Church of Valenciennes. Since 1668 Valenciennes has been in the Department du Nord of France. Previously it had been in Haincut, a province in the part of Spanish Netherlands.

      The name of Joris appears as Georges, illegitimate son of Jean on the baptismal record. It was not unusual for Walloon and Huguenot parents to take their children to Roman Catholic priests to be baptized in the absence of Protestant clergy or to escape persecution. Similarly, it was not uncommon for the priests to refuse to recognize the validity of Protestant marriages, recording the children of such marriages as "illegitimate".

      Joris, living in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1623, with his prospective bride, Catalina Trico, had been recruited with a number of other families, probably mostly Walloons, to go as colonists for the West India Company's venture in America. Their acceptance was subject to their being married before the ship's departure. To meet this requirement necessitated the publication of the intent to marry and the acturl marriage, a process which then usually required at least 3 weeks. The banns for Joris and Catalina were published on Saturday, January 11, 1624, and their marriage took place on Sunday, January 21, 1624 at the Walloon Church in Amsterdam. Joris was a weaver or textile worker, and Catalina was probably born in Pry, Belgium, not too far from Valencientes. Four days later, on January 25, 1624, the couple sailed on the Unity, Adrian Foriszen Tienpont, skipper. Few of their fellow passengers are known by name; though Sebastian Janszen Krol, John Monfort and his wife, Jacqueline Moreau, and about a dozen other families with marriageable daughters and sons , with 30 unaccompanied men, were aboard. Some were undoubtedly Walloons. The ship arrived in New Netherlands in late March or early April of 1624; and after a stay of just a few days, sailed up the Hudson River to Fort Orange (Albany), New York. These emigrants were the advance party for the colonization planned by the West India Company. Soon after the harvest of 1626, the Company resettled the 8 families living at Fort Orange, in Manhattan, which then became the center of operations for New Netherland. This included the Rapelje household which now included their first daughter, Sarah.

      There were only 270 white inhabitants of Manhattan at that time, and sufficient land so that the families brought down river could support themselves and have sufficient left over for victualling the ships which would put into the port of trade. Since Joris could not ply his trade of weaving under the regulations of the West India Company, he found it expedient to support his family in other ways. He opened the first tavern shortly after arriving in Manhattan. He was a tavernkeeper as late as March 16, 1648 when he and 11 other tavernkeepers promised as true men to live up to the newly imposed rules in every way and as best they could. The extensive rules were designed to control "unreasonable and intemperate drinking" at night and on Sundays, and the owners of taverns were required to have some other legitimate occupation. Joris chose farming at first and went in for cattle breeding. In June 1637 Joris bought from the Indians a plantation at the cove which the Dutch named Wallabought. Many year later it became the site of the brewery. Until the farm was well established and showing a good profit, and until he had satisfactory buildings on it, Joris and his family continued to live on Pearl Street which ectended to Bridge Street where the Manhattan tavern flourished. In 1655 Joris moved his family to the farm, and remained living there until his death

      The following are excerpts from Hugh T. Law's article, "Chapter 7, Ancestors Traced to France: Joris Jansen De Rapelje and Catharine Trico," How To Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, 1987, pp.84~86:37

      This Protestant country welcomed religious refugees from France, Belgium and other countries. French-speaking refugees founded churches in the Netherlands and held services in French. In the last century specialists made index cards of the baptism, marriage and burial records of these churches. They also combed their Dutch records and some French and German ones and made similar cards from entries pertaining to refugees and their descendants. They then alphabetized these cards, and the "Walloon Index" was born.
      In 1948, the Genealogical Society of Utah microfilmed it on 199 rolls of microfilm. This opened the way for Americans to do serious genealogical research on these foreign families in the Netherlands.(3)

      The first two entries for the Rapelje family in this index are dated in 1624, and the second of these, dated 13 January 1624 at Amsterdam, contains the marriage of two future emigrants to New York. It says, "Joris Raparlie born in Valenchiene (Valenciennes in French) (age) 19 (years), boratwercker (living at) Waelport (section of Amsterdam) and Catharina Triko (here spelled Friko, but in the original Dutch it is Trico)(living at) Nes (in Amsterdam) born at Pris in Waesland (French speaking area) (age) 18, accompanied by Marry Flamengh, her sister."(4) The original entry says that Catherine Trico was born at Paris, but this is deleted and "Pris" is recorded.

      In 1964 I wrote to the Archivist of the Departmental Archives of the Department of Nord, where Valenciennes is located. He sent me the name and address of a researcher, Monsieur F. Bleriot. This man mailed me a report on 24 September 1964. It contains extracts of the baptism record of Georges (French for the Dutch name, Joris) Rapareilliet, son Jean Rapareilliet, and of those of his older brothers and sisters. They were found in the records of St. Nicolas parish in Valenciennes. Indexes of other parishes there contain no baptism of a Georges Rapareilliet. The dates given below are baptism dates unless identified as burial dates:

      Jehenne (old form of Jeanne) daughter of Jean (John) Rapareilliet 1 August 1578.

      Marie, daughter of Jean Rapareilliet 29 July 1580.

      These two girls, born 14 or 16 years before the next children may be the daughters of another Jean or more likely of the same Jean's earlier marriage.

      I accept this George Rapareilliet as the future husband of Catherine Trico and as a progenitor of a million Americans and Canadians because:

      1. The French name Georges is Joris in Dutch.
      2. Born in April 1604 he was still nineteen on 13 January 1624, as his marriage record says.
      3. He was born where his marriage record claims: at Valenciennes.
      4. Protestantisme was outlawed in this area, then under Spanish rule, Jean Rapareilliet and his wife, if they had Protestant views, were required to have their children baptized in the Catholic Church.
      5. In America, Joris took the name Jansen, which means "son of Jan or Jean."
      6. The surname Rapareilliet is pronounced Raparlie (the spelling used in the 1624 marriage record with the dropping of one l.)
      Neither parish nor notarial records (wills, marriage contracts, sales of property, etc.) of Valenciennes are available early enough to extend this Rapareilliet line further.
      "Pris in Waesland" appears to be Prische, also in the Department of Nord, France. There the preserved parish records begin nearly a century after Catherine Trico's birth, but they contain many Trico names.

      In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapelje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen.(7) He spelled the surname Rapareilliet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.

      Also in 1972, Dr. George E. McCracken, Editor of the American Genealogist, and Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "Joris Janzsen Rapelje of Valenciennes and Catelyntje Jeronimus Trico of Pry."

      He arranged it from data received from one of my colleagues at the Genealogical Library. This article contains the marriage record of the above couple and Joris's (Georges') baptism record, but it doesn't name his brothers and sisters and differson Catelyntje's place of birth. I am indebted to Dr. McCracken for his interpretation of Joris' occupation. He suggests that a "boatwecker" was a "weaver of a certain kind of cloth which in French is called "'bure.'"(8) I agree with him, for a French dictionary calls "bure" a "loosely woven brown colored material of wool" and a Dutch one identifies "borat" as a weaver of wool cloth.(9)

      The indexes to the Bulletin historique et litteraire de la Societe de l'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais from 1852 to 1940 contain no reference to the surnames Rapelje or Rapareilliet.(10) Nor do the nine volumes of La France Protestante ou Vies des Protestants Francais qui se sont fait un nom dans l'Histoire. (Protestant France or Lives of France Protestants who made a name for themselves in History.)(11)

      Mr. Law concludes, "only Georges Rapareilliet baptized in Valenciennes on 28 April 1604, could be the emigrant to the New World, for only his birthplace matches that given in his 1624 marriage record."
      On 21 Jan 1623/24 when Joris Janszen was 18, he married Catalina Jeronimus TRICO, in Walloon Church at Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands.8

      They had the following children:
      49 i. Sarah Joris (1625-1685)
      ii. Marretje Jorise (1627-1685)
      iii. Jannetje2 (1629-)
      iv. Judith Jorise (1635-1726)
      v. Jan Joriszen (1637-1663)
      vi. Jacob (1639-)
      vii. Catalyntje (1641-)
      viii. Jeronimus (1643-1690)
      ix. Elisabeth Joris (1648-1712)
      x. Daniel Jorise (1650-1725)
      xi. Annetje Joris (1646-)





      [Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY. He was the son of 14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje and 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.] He married 7383. Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624.
      7383. Catalyntie Trico, born 1605 in Paris, France; died 11 Sep 1689 in Wallabout, LI, NY. She was the daughter of 14766. Joris Trico.

      14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje. He married 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.
      14765. Brecktje Rapelje. She was the daughter of 29530. Gaspard Colet de Rapelje and 29531. Janssen daughter of Abram.

      Children of Victor Rapelje and Brecktje Rapelje are:

      i. Antonie Rapelje.

      7382 ii. Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY; married Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624

      Joris Jansen de Rapalie was a French Huguenot from Rochelle in France who emigrated to America in 1623 in the ship Unity, a ship of the West India Company, and settled at Fort Orange (now Albany, New York), where he lived for 3 years. In 1626 he removed to New Amsterdam located on Manhattan Island, New York, until after the birth of his youngest child. He obtained from the West India Company a house and lot on Pearl Street where he lived for many years. The Pearl Street lot grant was confirmed to him with a deed dated March 13, 1647. On June 22, 1654 he sold his Pearl Street lot with its house that he had built-up to Hendrick Hendrickson.On June 16, 1637 he bought from the Indians a tract of 335 acres of land, he called Rennegaconock (now included within the town of Brooklyn, LI, NY. In 1655 he became a Long Island resident for the rest of his life. He was a leading citizen, acted a prominent part of public affairs of the colony and served in the magistracy of Brooklyn. In 1641 he was elected by the people as one of 12 men to advise the Council regarding Indian policy. He died soon after the close of the Dutch administration. His widow, Catalyentie, daughter of Joris Trico, surviving him many years. She was born in Paris, France and died in Wallabout, New York, on September 11, 1689 at age 84.

      In 1626, Joris and Catalyntje, with their daughter Sarah, moved to New Amsterdam, where they remained for the next 22 years. During at least part of that time, Joris was a tavern-keeper. His name appears in the records of the burgomasters court among those who promised to observe Governor Stuyvesant's proclamations regarding the regulation of taverns (these proclamations were in effect prior to the creation of the courts). In about 1655, Joris and Catalyntje, and presumably the younger children, moved to the farm on the 'Bay of the Walloons' or Waele-Boght. It was located where the present United States Marine Hospital now stands, and also included the area between Nostrand and Grand Avenues, about three hundred thirty acres altogether.

      Jorge (George) Jansen de Rappelje, Teunis Guysbert Bogart, and Jeremiah Remse Vanderbeeck, farmers from Waael in the Netherlands were the first men who began farming in the New Netherlands, at Wallabout, in 1625.

      Joris Janszen Repalje, Huguenot, son of Jean, was baptized April 26, 1604 at Valenciennes. He was one of six children of Jean Rapareillet and his unnamed wife. He was baptized April 28, 1604, as entered in the Register of St. Nicholaes Roman Catholic Church of Valenciennes. Since 1668 Valenciennes has been in the Department du Nord of France. Previously it had been in Haincut, a province in the part of Spanish Netherlands.

      The name of Joris appears as Georges, illegitimate son of Jean on the baptismal record. It was not unusual for Walloon and Huguenot parents to take their children to Roman Catholic priests to be baptized in the absence of Protestant clergy or to escape persecution. Similarly, it was not uncommon for the priests to refuse to recognize the validity of Protestant marriages, recording the children of such marriages as "illegitimate".

      Joris, living in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1623, with his prospective bride, Catalina Trico, had been recruited with a number of other families, probably mostly Walloons, to go as colonists for the West India Company's venture in America. Their acceptance was subject to their being married before the ship's departure. To meet this requirement necessitated the publication of the intent to marry and the acturl marriage, a process which then usually required at least 3 weeks. The banns for Joris and Catalina were published on Saturday, January 11, 1624, and their marriage took place on Sunday, January 21, 1624 at the Walloon Church in Amsterdam. Joris was a weaver or textile worker, and Catalina was probably born in Pry, Belgium, not too far from Valencientes. Four days later, on January 25, 1624, the couple sailed on the Unity, Adrian Foriszen Tienpont, skipper. Few of their fellow passengers are known by name; though Sebastian Janszen Krol, John Monfort and his wife, Jacqueline Moreau, and about a dozen other families with marriageable daughters and sons , with 30 unaccompanied men, were aboard. Some were undoubtedly Walloons. The ship arrived in New Netherlands in late March or early April of 1624; and after a stay of just a few days, sailed up the Hudson River to Fort Orange (Albany), New York. These emigrants were the advance party for the colonization planned by the West India Company. Soon after the harvest of 1626, the Company resettled the 8 families living at Fort Orange, in Manhattan, which then became the center of operations for New Netherland. This included the Rapelje household which now included their first daughter, Sarah.

      There were only 270 white inhabitants of Manhattan at that time, and sufficient land so that the families brought down river could support themselves and have sufficient left over for victualling the ships which would put into the port of trade. Since Joris could not ply his trade of weaving under the regulations of the West India Company, he found it expedient to support his family in other ways. He opened the first tavern shortly after arriving in Manhattan. He was a tavernkeeper as late as March 16, 1648 when he and 11 other tavernkeepers promised as true men to live up to the newly imposed rules in every way and as best they could. The extensive rules were designed to control "unreasonable and intemperate drinking" at night and on Sundays, and the owners of taverns were required to have some other legitimate occupation. Joris chose farming at first and went in for cattle breeding. In June 1637 Joris bought from the Indians a plantation at the cove which the Dutch named Wallabought. Many year later it became the site of the brewery. Until the farm was well established and showing a good profit, and until he had satisfactory buildings on it, Joris and his family continued to live on Pearl Street which ectended to Bridge Street where the Manhattan tavern flourished. In 1655 Joris moved his family to the farm, and remained living there until his death

      The following are excerpts from Hugh T. Law's article, "Chapter 7, Ancestors Traced to France: Joris Jansen De Rapelje and Catharine Trico," How To Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, 1987, pp.84~86:37

      This Protestant country welcomed religious refugees from France, Belgium and other countries. French-speaking refugees founded churches in the Netherlands and held services in French. In the last century specialists made index cards of the baptism, marriage and burial records of these churches. They also combed their Dutch records and some French and German ones and made similar cards from entries pertaining to refugees and their descendants. They then alphabetized these cards, and the "Walloon Index" was born.
      In 1948, the Genealogical Society of Utah microfilmed it on 199 rolls of microfilm. This opened the way for Americans to do serious genealogical research on these foreign families in the Netherlands.(3)

      The first two entries for the Rapelje family in this index are dated in 1624, and the second of these, dated 13 January 1624 at Amsterdam, contains the marriage of two future emigrants to New York. It says, "Joris Raparlie born in Valenchiene (Valenciennes in French) (age) 19 (years), boratwercker (living at) Waelport (section of Amsterdam) and Catharina Triko (here spelled Friko, but in the original Dutch it is Trico)(living at) Nes (in Amsterdam) born at Pris in Waesland (French speaking area) (age) 18, accompanied by Marry Flamengh, her sister."(4) The original entry says that Catherine Trico was born at Paris, but this is deleted and "Pris" is recorded.

      In 1964 I wrote to the Archivist of the Departmental Archives of the Department of Nord, where Valenciennes is located. He sent me the name and address of a researcher, Monsieur F. Bleriot. This man mailed me a report on 24 September 1964. It contains extracts of the baptism record of Georges (French for the Dutch name, Joris) Rapareilliet, son Jean Rapareilliet, and of those of his older brothers and sisters. They were found in the records of St. Nicolas parish in Valenciennes. Indexes of other parishes there contain no baptism of a Georges Rapareilliet. The dates given below are baptism dates unless identified as burial dates:

      Jehenne (old form of Jeanne) daughter of Jean (John) Rapareilliet 1 August 1578.

      Marie, daughter of Jean Rapareilliet 29 July 1580.

      These two girls, born 14 or 16 years before the next children may be the daughters of another Jean or more likely of the same Jean's earlier marriage.

      I accept this George Rapareilliet as the future husband of Catherine Trico and as a progenitor of a million Americans and Canadians because:

      1. The French name Georges is Joris in Dutch.
      2. Born in April 1604 he was still nineteen on 13 January 1624, as his marriage record says.
      3. He was born where his marriage record claims: at Valenciennes.
      4. Protestantisme was outlawed in this area, then under Spanish rule, Jean Rapareilliet and his wife, if they had Protestant views, were required to have their children baptized in the Catholic Church.
      5. In America, Joris took the name Jansen, which means "son of Jan or Jean."
      6. The surname Rapareilliet is pronounced Raparlie (the spelling used in the 1624 marriage record with the dropping of one l.)
      Neither parish nor notarial records (wills, marriage contracts, sales of property, etc.) of Valenciennes are available early enough to extend this Rapareilliet line further.
      "Pris in Waesland" appears to be Prische, also in the Department of Nord, France. There the preserved parish records begin nearly a century after Catherine Trico's birth, but they contain many Trico names.

      In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapelje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen.(7) He spelled the surname Rapareilliet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.

      Also in 1972, Dr. George E. McCracken, Editor of the American Genealogist, and Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "Joris Janzsen Rapelje of Valenciennes and Catelyntje Jeronimus Trico of Pry."

      He arranged it from data received from one of my colleagues at the Genealogical Library. This article contains the marriage record of the above couple and Joris's (Georges') baptism record, but it doesn't name his brothers and sisters and differson Catelyntje's place of birth. I am indebted to Dr. McCracken for his interpretation of Joris' occupation. He suggests that a "boatwecker" was a "weaver of a certain kind of cloth which in French is called "'bure.'"(8) I agree with him, for a French dictionary calls "bure" a "loosely woven brown colored material of wool" and a Dutch one identifies "borat" as a weaver of wool cloth.(9)

      The indexes to the Bulletin historique et litteraire de la Societe de l'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais from 1852 to 1940 contain no reference to the surnames Rapelje or Rapareilliet.(10) Nor do the nine volumes of La France Protestante ou Vies des Protestants Francais qui se sont fait un nom dans l'Histoire. (Protestant France or Lives of France Protestants who made a name for themselves in History.)(11)

      Mr. Law concludes, "only Georges Rapareilliet baptized in Valenciennes on 28 April 1604, could be the emigrant to the New World, for only his birthplace matches that given in his 1624 marriage record."
      On 21 Jan 1623/24 when Joris Janszen was 18, he married Catalina Jeronimus TRICO, in Walloon Church at Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands.8

      They had the following children:
      49 i. Sarah Joris (1625-1685)
      ii. Marretje Jorise (1627-1685)
      iii. Jannetje2 (1629-)
      iv. Judith Jorise (1635-1726)
      v. Jan Joriszen (1637-1663)
      vi. Jacob (1639-)
      vii. Catalyntje (1641-)
      viii. Jeronimus (1643-1690)
      ix. Elisabeth Joris (1648-1712)
      x. Daniel Jorise (1650-1725)
      xi. Annetje Joris (1646-)



      [Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY. He was the son of 14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje and 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.] He married 7383. Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624.
      7383. Catalyntie Trico, born 1605 in Paris, France; died 11 Sep 1689 in Wallabout, LI, NY. She was the daughter of 14766. Joris Trico.

      14764. Victor Honorius Rapelje. He married 14765. Brecktje Rapelje.
      14765. Brecktje Rapelje. She was the daughter of 29530. Gaspard Colet de Rapelje and 29531. Janssen daughter of Abram.

      Children of Victor Rapelje and Brecktje Rapelje are:

      i. Antonie Rapelje.

      7382 ii. Joris Janssen Rapelje, born Abt. 1603 in Rochelle, france; died 21 Feb 1662 in Brooklyn, NY; married Catalyntie Trico 21 Jan 1624

      Joris Jansen de Rapalie was a French Huguenot from Rochelle in France who emigrated to America in 1623 in the ship Unity, a ship of the West India Company, and settled at Fort Orange (now Albany, New York), where he lived for 3 years. In 1626 he removed to New Amsterdam located on Manhattan Island, New York, until after the birth of his youngest child. He obtained from the West India Company a house and lot on Pearl Street where he lived for many years. The Pearl Street lot grant was confirmed to him with a deed dated March 13, 1647. On June 22, 1654 he sold his Pearl Street lot with its house that he had built-up to Hendrick Hendrickson.On June 16, 1637 he bought from the Indians a tract of 335 acres of land, he called Rennegaconock (now included within the town of Brooklyn, L.I., New York. In 1655 he became a Long Island resident for the rest of his life. He was a leading citizen, acted a prominent part of public affairs of the colony and served in the magistracy of Brooklyn. In 1641 he was elected by the people as one of 12 men to advise the Council regarding Indian policy. He died soon after the close of the Dutch administration. His widow, Catalyentie, daughter of Joris Trico, surviving him many years. She was born in Paris, France and died in Wallabout, New York, on September 11, 1689 at age 84.

      In 1626, Joris and Catalyntje, with their daughter Sarah, moved to New Amsterdam, where they remained for the next 22 years. During at least part of that time, Joris was a tavern-keeper. His name appears in the records of the burgomasters court among those who promised to observe Governor Stuyvesant's proclamations regarding the regulation of taverns (these proclamations were in effect prior to the creation of the courts). In about 1655, Joris and Catalyntje, and presumably the younger children, moved to the farm on the 'Bay of the Walloons' or Waele-Boght. It was located where the present United States Marine Hospital now stands, and also included the area between Nostrand and Grand Avenues, about three hundred thirty acres altogether.

      Jorge (George) Jansen de Rappelje, Teunis Guysbert Bogart, and Jeremiah Remse Vanderbeeck, farmers from Waael in the Netherlands were the first men who began farming in the New Netherlands, at Wallabout, in 1625.

      Joris Janszen Repalje, Huguenot, son of Jean, was baptized April 26, 1604 at Valenciennes. He was one of six children of Jean Rapareillet and his unnamed wife. He was baptized April 28, 1604, as entered in the Register of St. Nicholaes Roman Catholic Church of Valenciennes. Since 1668 Valenciennes has been in the Department du Nord of France. Previously it had been in Haincut, a province in the part of Spanish Netherlands.

      The name of Joris appears as Georges, illegitimate son of Jean on the baptismal record. It was not unusual for Walloon and Huguenot parents to take their children to Roman Catholic priests to be baptized in the absence of Protestant clergy or to escape persecution. Similarly, it was not uncommon for the priests to refuse to recognize the validity of Protestant marriages, recording the children of such marriages as "illegitimate".

      Joris, living in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1623, with his prospective bride, Catalina Trico, had been recruited with a number of other families, probably mostly Walloons, to go as colonists for the West India Company's venture in America. Their acceptance was subject to their being married before the ship's departure. To meet this requirement necessitated the publication of the intent to marry and the acturl marriage, a process which then usually required at least 3 weeks. The banns for Joris and Catalina were published on Saturday, January 11, 1624, and their marriage took place on Sunday, January 21, 1624 at the Walloon Church in Amsterdam. Joris was a weaver or textile worker, and Catalina was probably born in Pry, Belgium, not too far from Valencientes. Four days later, on January 25, 1624, the couple sailed on the Unity, Adrian Foriszen Tienpont, skipper. Few of their fellow passengers are known by name; though Sebastian Janszen Krol, John Monfort and his wife, Jacqueline Moreau, and about a dozen other families with marriageable daughters and sons , with 30 unaccompanied men, were aboard. Some were undoubtedly Walloons. The ship arrived in New Netherlands in late March or early April of 1624; and after a stay of just a few days, sailed up the Hudson River to Fort Orange (Albany), New York. These emigrants were the advance party for the colonization planned by the West India Company. Soon after the harvest of 1626, the Company resettled the 8 families living at Fort Orange, in Manhattan, which then became the center of operations for New Netherland. This included the Rapelje household which now included their first daughter, Sarah.

      There were only 270 white inhabitants of Manhattan at that time, and sufficient land so that the families brought down river could support themselves and have sufficient left over for victualling the ships which would put into the port of trade. Since Joris could not ply his trade of weaving under the regulations of the West India Company, he found it expedient to support his family in other ways. He opened the first tavern shortly after arriving in Manhattan. He was a tavernkeeper as late as March 16, 1648 when he and 11 other tavernkeepers promised as true men to live up to the newly imposed rules in every way and as best they could. The extensive rules were designed to control "unreasonable and intemperate drinking" at night and on Sundays, and the owners of taverns were required to have some other legitimate occupation. Joris chose farming at first and went in for cattle breeding. In June 1637 Joris bought from the Indians a plantation at the cove which the Dutch named Wallabought. Many year later it became the site of the brewery. Until the farm was well established and showing a good profit, and until he had satisfactory buildings on it, Joris and his family continued to live on Pearl Street which ectended to Bridge Street where the Manhattan tavern flourished. In 1655 Joris moved his family to the farm, and remained living there until his death

      The following are excerpts from Hugh T. Law's article, "Chapter 7, Ancestors Traced to France: Joris Jansen De Rapelje and Catharine Trico," How To Trace Your Ancestors to Europe, 1987, pp.84~86:37

      This Protestant country welcomed religious refugees from France, Belgium and other countries. French-speaking refugees founded churches in the Netherlands and held services in French. In the last century specialists made index cards of the baptism, marriage and burial records of these churches. They also combed their Dutch records and some French and German ones and made similar cards from entries pertaining to refugees and their descendants. They then alphabetized these cards, and the "Walloon Index" was born.
      In 1948, the Genealogical Society of Utah microfilmed it on 199 rolls of microfilm. This opened the way for Americans to do serious genealogical research on these foreign families in the Netherlands.(3)

      The first two entries for the Rapelje family in this index are dated in 1624, and the second of these, dated 13 January 1624 at Amsterdam, contains the marriage of two future emigrants to New York. It says, "Joris Raparlie born in Valenchiene (Valenciennes in French) (age) 19 (years), boratwercker (living at) Waelport (section of Amsterdam) and Catharina Triko (here spelled Friko, but in the original Dutch it is Trico)(living at) Nes (in Amsterdam) born at Pris in Waesland (French speaking area) (age) 18, accompanied by Marry Flamengh, her sister."(4) The original entry says that Catherine Trico was born at Paris, but this is deleted and "Pris" is recorded.

      In 1964 I wrote to the Archivist of the Departmental Archives of the Department of Nord, where Valenciennes is located. He sent me the name and address of a researcher, Monsieur F. Bleriot. This man mailed me a report on 24 September 1964. It contains extracts of the baptism record of Georges (French for the Dutch name, Joris) Rapareilliet, son Jean Rapareilliet, and of those of his older brothers and sisters. They were found in the records of St. Nicolas parish in Valenciennes. Indexes of other parishes there contain no baptism of a Georges Rapareilliet. The dates given below are baptism dates unless identified as burial dates:

      Jehenne (old form of Jeanne) daughter of Jean (John) Rapareilliet 1 August 1578.

      Marie, daughter of Jean Rapareilliet 29 July 1580.

      These two girls, born 14 or 16 years before the next children may be the daughters of another Jean or more likely of the same Jean's earlier marriage.

      I accept this George Rapareilliet as the future husband of Catherine Trico and as a progenitor of a million Americans and Canadians because:

      1. The French name Georges is Joris in Dutch.
      2. Born in April 1604 he was still nineteen on 13 January 1624, as his marriage record says.
      3. He was born where his marriage record claims: at Valenciennes.
      4. Protestantisme was outlawed in this area, then under Spanish rule, Jean Rapareilliet and his wife, if they had Protestant views, were required to have their children baptized in the Catholic Church.
      5. In America, Joris took the name Jansen, which means "son of Jan or Jean."
      6. The surname Rapareilliet is pronounced Raparlie (the spelling used in the 1624 marriage record with the dropping of one l.)
      Neither parish nor notarial records (wills, marriage contracts, sales of property, etc.) of Valenciennes are available early enough to extend this Rapareilliet line further.
      "Pris in Waesland" appears to be Prische, also in the Department of Nord, France. There the preserved parish records begin nearly a century after Catherine Trico's birth, but they contain many Trico names.

      In 1972 George Olin Zabriskie, Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "The Rapelje-Rapelje Family." He used the Raparlie-Trico marriage and with my permission the Rapareilliet baptism and burial records from Valenciennes. I publish them here because many people interested in this family probably have not seen his article in the magazine, de Halve Maen.(7) He spelled the surname Rapareilliet, as in my researcher's report. But I now see in the microfilmed records that it is spelled "Rapareilliet," more like the "Raparlie" spelling used in the Amsterdam record.

      Also in 1972, Dr. George E. McCracken, Editor of the American Genealogist, and Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, published an article entitled, "Joris Janzsen Rapelje of Valenciennes and Catelyntje Jeronimus Trico of Pry."

      He arranged it from data received from one of my colleagues at the Genealogical Library. This article contains the marriage record of the above couple and Joris's (Georges') baptism record, but it doesn't name his brothers and sisters and differson Catelyntje's place of birth. I am indebted to Dr. McCracken for his interpretation of Joris' occupation. He suggests that a "boatwecker" was a "weaver of a certain kind of cloth which in French is called "'bure.'"(8) I agree with him, for a French dictionary calls "bure" a "loosely woven brown colored material of wool" and a Dutch one identifies "borat" as a weaver of wool cloth.(9)

      The indexes to the Bulletin historique et litteraire de la Societe de l'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais from 1852 to 1940 contain no reference to the surnames Rapelje or Rapareilliet.(10) Nor do the nine volumes of La France Protestante ou Vies des Protestants Francais qui se sont fait un nom dans l'Histoire. (Protestant France or Lives of France Protestants who made a name for themselves in History.)(11)

      Mr. Law concludes, "only Georges Rapareilliet baptized in Valenciennes on 28 April 1604, could be the emigrant to the New World, for only his birthplace matches that given in his 1624 marriage record."
      On 21 Jan 1623/24 when Joris Janszen was 18, he married Catalina Jeronimus TRICO, in Walloon Church at Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands.8

      They had the following children:
      49 i. Sarah Joris (1625-1685)
      ii. Marretje Jorise (1627-1685)
      iii. Jannetje2 (1629-)
      iv. Judith Jorise (1635-1726)
      v. Jan Joriszen (1637-1663)
      vi. Jacob (1639-)
      vii. Catalyntje (1641-)
      viii. Jeronimus (1643-1690)
      ix. Elisabeth Joris (1648-1712)
      x. Daniel Jorise (1650-1725)
      xi. Annetje Joris (1646-)





      [1.GED]

      [vanderbilt.jacob.1723.ancestors.ftw]

      Married: 21 JAN 1623 in Amsterdam, N. Holland, Netherlands 1
      Children
      Sara J oris RAPALJE b: ABT. 1623
      Jannetje RAPALJE b: BET. 1624 - 1634
      Jan RAPALJE b: BET. 1625 - 1635
      Marritie RAPALJE b: 11 MAR 1626 in New Amsterdam, New Yor k
      Jacob RAPALJE b: BET. 1626 - 1636
      Annetje RAPALJE b: BET. 1627 - 1637
      D aniel RAPALJE b: BET. 1628 - 1638
      Catalyntie RAPALJE b: BET. 1629 - 1639
      Ju dith RAPALJE b: 5 JUL 1635
      Jeronimus RAPALJE b: 27 JUN 1643
      Lysbeth RAPALJE b: MAR 1647 in New Amsterdam, New York

  • Sources 
    1. [S16] The Toers - Tuers Family, Howard S. F. Randolph.