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Charles FEDERLICHNER

Charles FEDERLICHNER

Male 1841 - 1907  (65 years)

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  • Name Charles FEDERLICHNER 
    Born 4 Feb 1841  Karlsruhe, Baden, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    MILI Served in 4th New York Regiment 
    OCCU Baker 
    RES 1889 345 East 31st Street, NY, NY, 1880 307 10th Avenue, NY, NY (Hells Kitchen) 
    RESI 1880  307 Tenth Ave. New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Jan 1907  Togus National Cemetery, Kennebec, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 20 Jan 1907  Togus Soldiers Home, Maine Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I19  The Turses
    Last Modified 2 Feb 2014 

    Family Elizabeth LAUDT,   b. 1 Feb 1844, Darmstadt, Hess, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1880  (Age 35 years) 
    Married 11 Feb 1866  [1
    Children 
     1. Anna (Elizabeth) FEDERLICHNER,   b. 16 Mar 1866, 78 Lewis St., New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1921, Hillsdale, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
     2. Charles FEDERLICHNER, Jr.,   b. 1875, New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Elizabeth (Lil) FEDERLICHNER,   b. 14 Nov 1875, New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Nov 1961, Park Ridge, Bergen, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     4. Caroline (Carrie) FEDERLICHNER,   b. 1879, 219 Rivington St., New York, NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jul 1959, Park Ridge, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    Last Modified 11 Oct 2016 
    Family ID F12  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Jan 1907 - Togus National Cemetery, Kennebec, ME Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 20 Jan 1907 - Togus Soldiers Home, Maine Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Federal Cavalry troops at Bull Run in late 1862.
    Federal Cavalry troops at Bull Run in late 1862.
    Charles Federlichner, Jim's German immigrant great-grandfather on his mother's side served under Medal of Honor winner, Colonel Louis P. di Cesnola, in this unit during the time the photo was taken. Di Cesnola was captured at Aldie, VA in June, 1863 and held prisoner for 10 months.
    Federal Cavalry - 4th New York Cavalry crossing the Rappanhannock River in Virginia abt 1863
    Federal Cavalry - 4th New York Cavalry crossing the Rappanhannock River in Virginia abt 1863
    Charles Federlichner was serving in this unit at the time the picture was taken. The regiment, also known as "The 1st Regiment," "The German Cavalry," "Dickel's Mounted Rifles," and the "Lincoln Greens" was detached with its brigade (Pennock Huey's) in Maryland during the Battle of Gettysburg. The first colonel of the regiment was Christian F. Dickel, who subsequently resigned on September 10, 1862. Dickel had owned a riding academy on 43rd Street in New York City.

    The major battles the regiment participated in were:
    Harrisonburg, Cross-Keys, Port Republic, Bull Run, Berryville, Fredericksburg, Barnett's Ford, Grove Church, Trevilian Station, Deep Bottom, Front Royal, Kearneysville, Kelly's Ford, Chancellorsville, Beverly Ford, Upperville, Gettysburg, Brandy Station, Morton Ford, Oak Hill, and Mine Run. The 4th, comprised of an ethnic diversity of Germans, Frenchmen, Italians, Brits, and Hungarians, was Calvary Corps Commander, Alfred Pleasonton's least favorite unit. Pleasonton distrusted anyone not born in America, and constantly demoted or eliminated them on this sole and discriminatory criteria. It was said that orders to the regiment "had to be issued in six or seven different languages." Although surrounded by controversy and criticized for its unreliability, there is a monument to the unit on the field at Gettysburg honoring their service.
    4th New York Cavalry Monument
    4th New York Cavalry Monument
    Monument is on Pleasonton Avenue, Gettysburg Tour. Charles Federlichner served with this unit during the Civil War, and later lived out his days at the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers at Togus, Maine. He was one of nearly 200,000 German immigrants who served the Union during the war. The inscription on the monument reads:

    "This regiment participated in
    the Gettysburg Campaign until
    reaching Hanover Junction
    June 30th, when with the Brigade
    it was detached and moved to
    Manchester where it picketed
    the surrounding country until
    July 3rd, when it proceeded to
    Westminster. On the 4th it
    joined Kilpatrick's Division
    in pursuit of the enemy and with
    it participated at Monterey
    Pass that night, and in the many
    other cavalry engagements
    until the enemy recrossed
    the Potomac"

  • Notes 
    • Civil War records show his name as Federlichtle and Federlechner. There is one other family with the name spelled Federlechner which settled in the Buffalo, New York area. We have tried over the years to link the two, but have yet to find an appropriate document.

      Birth dates in military and related records are given as 1838. The New York Marriages record shows 1841. The most complete profile we have is based on military records.

      Charles mustered in 10 Aug 1861, at New York, as a corporal with Company A, 4th New York Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps during the Civil War. His records show 36 months of service in the war. We know he lived his final days at the Soldiers Home, Togus, Maine, and is buried there. He entered the home at the age of 54 with a pension of $10 per month. In 1893 he is listed as the Head Baker at the Soldiers Home.

      The documents we reviewed show he was wounded following the Gettysburg Campaign, quite likely near Middleburg,VA during skirmishes with Maj Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry near Alexandria, Virginia in June-July 1863. Through the spring and summer of 1863, the 4th NY was engaged in constant scouting and skirmishing between the Rapidan and Rappahannock as part of Averell's cavalry division. June of '63 brought heavy action for the Fourth New York troopers. The regiment was engaged all day at Aldie on June 17, with the loss of many men along with Colonel di Cesnola, a Medal of Honor winner who commanded the unit during some of the heaviest fighting. Cesnola was wounded and captured at Aldie. Charles is listed among the slightly wounded at Aldie on 17 June 1863 in a dispatch from Middleburgh, VA. This regiment participated in the Gettysburg Campaign until reaching Hanover Junction June 30th, when with the Brigade it was detached and moved to Manchester where it picketed the surrounding country until July 3rd, when it proceeded to Westminster. On the 4th it joined Kilpatrick's Division in pursuit of the enemy and with it participated at Monterey Pass that night, and in the many other cavalry engagements until the enemy recrossed the Potomac. A monument to the Regiment may be viewed at Pleasanton Avenue in Gettysburg. The regiment was commanded during the Gettysburg campaign by Lieutenant Colonel Augustus Pruyn and consisted of 298 men.

      We know from the Adjutant General’s account in the documents of the New York Assembly that Charles was likely badly wounded in that he was assigned to 116th Company, 2nd Battalion, Veterans Reserve Corps to serve out his time in service. 1st Battalion was established for lightly wounded soldiers, while the 2nd Battalion was established for those more seriously wounded.

      He had been previously captured at Manassas Plains in August 1862 and later released at Gainesville, VA in early September 1862. He deserted May 2, 1863, and returned under Presidential proclamation. He was mustered out 1 Oct 1864.

      Charles is listed again as wounded in the head and side in this dispatch:
      WAR CORRESPONDENCE.
      HEAD-QUARTERS , NEAR ALEXANDRIA, VA.,
      AUGUST 3D, 1863.
      FRIEND BRADBURY - - Weeks have passed away since I last wrote to you. I am still alive and in the "sunny south," thriving by chance, and like a seabird sporting on the shores of the majestic Potomac, in Alexandria-- poor, a "Soger," but nevertheless happy in the present and confiding in the future. I am Orderly Bugler at Head-quarters, having a fine time of it. At all times the Colonel commanding seems so good to me and obliging that I have become his inseparable friend and companion—I know not very well how, or why. Now my heart experiences those contradictory and complicated emotions, which agitate and discompose my existence. I tell you, friend Dan, when this cruel war is over, I will not be fit for much more than a cook's-mate's minister to read Psalms to rats. That is according to army regulations. I begin to experience the want of sweet companionship; although I enjoy unrestrained liberty, I have no devoted attendant to seek me and bring me back to the bosom of my home—not even a dog to warn me of danger, for it "lieth at my door." Yet I never experienced harm. I have wandered over the mountains and marshes without a guide and without a watch, and sometimes with no other couch than the moss-covered rocks or some marshy swamp, with mosquitoes formed in line of battle on my left and center. Yes! grey-backs, too—so help me Bob. I dine sumptuously. In short, I lead a free and joyous life, without incurring more risk or feeling more emotion than might be experienced by an old man of my age. If you want me to write, give me a clear surface, and that too of a good quality. If it be too hard, I can make no impression on it; if too soft, I shall destroy it at the first stroke. In short, although I acknowledge the extraordinary talents of the young correspondent of the Argus, in a letter I told the worthy shemale, with some temper and ironical humility, at the end of her first lesson, that her method was not adapted to a pupil so far advanced, and that a Master could only embarrass and retard the natural progress and invincible development of so superior an organization. More anon.
      H. DELAMATER.
      Troop G, 4th N. Y. Cavalry.

      FOURTH NEW-YORK CAVALRY.
      Ferd. Rosenbergr, Co. F— wounded and prisoner.
      Robt. Brown, Co. F—killed.
      William Kennelly, Co. F— wounded.
      Isaac Campbell, Co. F—head.
      E. Reeve, Co. K—right elbow.
      Pat. Smith, Co. K—head.
      Wm. Finnigan, Co. E—head.
      Sergt. Geo. Tindle, Co. C—abdomen.
      Chas. Fetterlechner, Co. A. head and side.
      Thos. Marshall. Co. F-neck.
      Thos. Grady—right shoulder
      Wm, Kenly, Co. F—sabre cut on head and hand.
      Corp. Ryan, Co. F—neck.

      Inscription on 4th NY monument at Gettysburg:
      4TH NEW -YORK CAVALRY 2ND BRIG. 2ND DIV. CAVALRY CORPS.
      Reverse - THIS REGIMENT PARTICIPATED IN THE GETTYSBURG CAMPAIGN UNTIL REACHING HANOVER JUNCTION JUNE 30, WHEN WITH THE BRIGADE IT WAS DETACHED AND MOVED TO MANCHESTER, WHERE IT PICKETED THE SURROUNDING COUNTRY UNTIL JULY 3, WHEN IT PROCEEDED TO WESTMINISTER. ON THE 4TH, IT JOINED KILPATRICK'S DIVISION IN PURSUIT OF THE ENEMY AND WITH IT PARTICIPATED AT MONTEREY PASS THAT NIGHT AND IN THE MANY OTHER CAVALRY ENGAGEMENTS UNTIL THE ENEMY RECROSSED THE POTOMAC

      Source
      New York State Military Museum
      and Veterans Research Center
      61 Lake Avenue
      Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

      Charles also probably fought at Kelly’s Ford, VA.
      Kelly’s Ford was one of the early larger scale cavalry fights in Virginia that set the stage for Brandy Station and cavalry actions of the Gettysburg campaign. Twenty-one hundred troopers of Averell’s cavalry division crossed the Rappahannock River to attack the Confederate cavalry. Fitzhugh Lee counterattacked with a brigade of about 800 men. Thereis a monument in the woods today marking the death of Maj John Pelham, CSA, commanding the Stuart Horse Cavalry who died on March 17, 1863.

      Source: http://usa-civil-war.com/Kellys_Ford/kellys_map.gif

      1889 Residency Trow's New York City Directory. 1889
      345 E 31st Street, NY, NY near NYU Medical Center today

      1900 Federal Census Residency - Eastern Branch National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Kennebec, Maine. Records indicate he was first admitted at age 54

      Buried at Soldiers Home, Togus, Maine
      [Section O]
      2268
      --------
      C.
      FEDERLICHNER
      CO.A.
      4 N.Y.CAV.
      ***************************************
      Gravestone of Charles Federlichner in Section O, East Side, Togus National Cemetery in Chelsea, Kennebec County, Maine. [3]

    Buried:
    • Plot O 2268

  • Sources 
    1. [S727] New York Marriages 1686- 1980.

    2. [S403] George Ritter Descendants.

    3. [S42] Military Service Record.